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Beannachtaí an tSéasúir (BAN-ock-tee on Tay-zure) - Season's Greetings
by Bridget Haggerty

In Ireland, one of the most commonly used phrases around the holidays is "Happy Christmas." We thought you might enjoy learning how to say it in Irish as well as a few other phrases you'll hear this time of year.

If you were to say Happy Christmas to just one other person, you would say:

"Nollaig Shona Duit"
(NO-Lihg HO-nuh ghwich).
However, if you were to be addressing the same greeting to two or more persons, you would say:
"Nollaig Shona Daoibh"
(NO-Lihg HO-nuh JEEV)
This literally means "You have a Happy Christmas."

The most common response to this would be: "Nollaig Mhaith Chugat"
(NO-lihg Wy HU-gut)
Literally-"A good Christmas to you."

If one were to wish someone a "Happy New Year," he or she would say:

"Athbhliain faoi Mhaise Duit"
(AH-vlee ihn fwee WAH-shuh wich)

And if one were to be addressing two or more other persons, he or she would say:
"Athbhliain faoi Mhaise Daoibh"
(AH vlee-ihn fwee WAH-shuh Heev)
Literally-"You have a Prosperous New Year."

Just as in English, the two expressions are often combined to say “Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year” as follows:

“Nollaig Shona agus Athbhliain faoi Mhaise Duit.”
(NO-lihg HO-nuh AH-guhs AH-vlee-ihn fwee WAH-shuh wich).

Le gach dea-ghui i gcomhair na nollag agus na h-ath bhliana! (With Best Wishes for Christmas and the New Year!)

The plural of this would be:
“Nollaig Shona agus Athbhliain faoi Mhaise Daoibh.”
(NO-lihg HO-nuh AH-guhs AH-vlee-ihn fwee WAH-shuh HEEV).

For every greeting above, the common response is:
“Go mba hé duit”
(guh may hay wich)
Meaning: “The same to you.”

If you have tried to learn these phrases in Irish, and all earnest attempts have failed, just try the universal greeting...lift a pint, thrust it forward in the internationally accepted toast, and you will be a hit in any language. (Especially if you buy the house a round.)

For more Holiday Irish words and phrases, please click Holiday Irish.

Note: Letter groups that are capitalized indicate the stressed syllables. There has also been much debate as to whether Shona is pronounced with the sh sound or said as hona. As we understand it, much depends on what part of Ireland you are in.
Resources: Content is edited from the Irish Heritage Newsletter. If you would like to receive the newsletter, please email George at Steeler059@aol.com
Images: Greeting card from Irish Abroad free cards.

For more of our Holiday Stories click on the following links.
Advent/Christmas Holidays
Time at this Point in the Year
An Advent Memory
Yes, Kelsey and Maddie, there is a Santa Claus
Waiting for St. Nicholas
Christmas - Preparing the Puddings
Christmas - Food for the Feast
An Irish Christmas - Then & Now
An Irish Christmas - The Day Before
Memories of Christmas Eve Past
An Irish Christmas - Ding Dong Merrily On High
Seasons Greetings in Irish
St. Stephen's Day to New Year's Eve
New Year's Day to Epiphany
Many Years Ago by John B. Keane
Rowing to Christmas Mass
Burying the Baby Jesus
White Washed Walls
An East Cork Christmas

 

Sun, Nov 23, 2014


O’Sullivan’s Cascade, Killarney

According to legend the waterfall once ran with whiskey. The Chieftain of the Fianna, Fionn MacCumhal, resided above the Cascade on Tomies Mountain. It was here that he kept his personal supply of the finest uisgebeatha. O'Sullivan of Tomies was lucky enough to share this delightful drop, being the only man bold enough to stand up to Fionn. Sadly, when the Sassenagh invaded Ireland, O'Sullivan's Cascade changed into water.
Photo credit: Synergise


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