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Photos, Art Prints & Posters

N
ote: We consider any work produced by an artist an "Art Print", regardless of size or medium. Any photograph is under the heading "Photos", again, regardless of size. The rest are grouped as "posters". Yes, regardless of size - hope this isn't confusing.
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Bed & Breakfast, Galway
by William Sutton


Oratory of Gallarus
by Richard Cummins


Abandoned Farmhouse in Cork
by Richard Cummins



Jameson Irish Whiskey
by R. Campbell


Note: If you look closely you may Buy Irish Landscape I at AllPosters.comsee this watermark on some of the images.
It will NOT appear on your copy.

One
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Sun, Apr 12, 2015


Irish Furze

Called whin in the north and gorse in the east, furze was once a symbol of wealth and fertility of land as is emphasized by the saying: "gold under furze, silver under rushes and famine under heather."
As indigenous to the early summer landscape as rhododendrons, it is despised by farmers because of its invasive properties; but in the past, it had many good uses.
It ignites quickly, so it was used for starting the fire: it was also used for cleaning the chimney, tilling the soil, dyeing wool and fabric, and as a flavouring for whiskey (which may have improved its rating with the farmers!). It had medicinal powers and its magical powers were undisputed in preventing the good people from stealing the butter on May day. And, at mid-summer, blazing branches were carried round the herd to bring good health to the cows for the coming year.
Resources: Doon Mayo
and Farmers Journal


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March 4, 2011
   
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